Micah Explains the Coming Destruction

Commentary on
Micah 5:4-7

4  And he shall stand and feed in the strength of Yehuveh, in the majesty of the name of Yehuveh his Elohim; and they shall abide: for now shall he be great unto the ends of the earth.
5  And this man shall be the peace, when the Assyrian shall come into our land: and when he shall tread in our palaces, then shall we raise against him seven shepherds, and eight principal men.
6  And they shall waste the land of Assyria with the sword, and the land of Nimrod in the entrances thereof: thus shall he deliver us from the Assyrian, when he cometh into our land, and when he treadeth within our borders.
7  And the remnant of Jacob shall be in the midst of many people as a dew from Yehuveh, as the showers upon the grass, that tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men.

Commentary on 5:4-5
[30 May 2006]:  In both these verses, as above, he is supplied. Just removing that part of the construction and considering alternate readings for each word yields a very different piccture: “Stand and feed in the strength of Yehuveh, in the majesty of the name of Yehuveh Elohim; and they shall abide: now expand unto the ends of the earth. And this shall be peace, when righteousness [Assyrian comes from the Hebrew word for uprightness, rightness] shall come into land and walk in high places, then arise complete provisions, and more than complete flowing [poured out] health [radiant man, ruddiness].”

Commentary on 5:6-7 [4 June 2006]:  In the beginning of this verse, they is a supplied pronoun. In the original Hebrew, this verse could refer to Yehuveh rather than to Israel, thus reading: “And He shall waste/depasture the land of Assyria/Iraq with the sword/drought, and the land of Nimrod/Iran in the entrances/open places thereof: thus shall he deliver us from the Assyrian, when he cometh into our land, and when he treadeth within our borders.” If this is a matter of drought rather than warfare, it is definitely Yehuveh’s hand and becomes a part of Yehuveh’s vengeance rather than being human self-defense. Drought deprives both man and livestock of food, thereby forcing the people of a country to turn from aggressive warfare to the more mundane effort of just surviving. This is much more in harmony with verse 7 where Jacob is pictured as “dew” and as “showers upon the grass,” both very passive and non-combative symbols!


Gael Bataman
Originally Written:     30 May 2006
Latest Update:          19 September 2007


Return to Zadok Home             Continue . . .            Return One Page              Go to Micah Introduction